Divider
Divider

Make Tax Research Less Taxing

Although the basic pricing and services of the products are similar, it’s the extras — level of service, degree of customization and ease of access — that differentiates them.

January 2008
by Anthony Catanach, et al./Journal of Accountancy

Selecting a Web-based tax research service is not a simple task. Commercial publishers offer a variety of premium and economy plans that can be bundled and priced in many ways. The variations make the selection process especially difficult. Although the basic pricing and services of the products are similar, it’s the extras — such as level of service, degree of customization and ease of access — that differentiate them.

This article is designed to help you wade through the product details to find the service that best suits their needs and budget.

Go for the Web

Web-based services have two advantages over paper-based or noncommercial Internet resources: You can toggle easily between primary and secondary sources through hypertext links and you can use keywords to search sources simultaneously.

For practitioners who prefer more traditional research methods, most Web-based products also permit searches by citation, table of contents or topical index. A Web-based service also provides daily updates of primary and secondary sources and enables access to the data from any computer with an Internet connection. In addition, you no longer need to update a large paper library continuously.

Read the full article here.